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A Paintbrush in My Hand

$125.00
  • Book Details

Author: Odjig, Daphne with the assistance of R.M. Vanderburgh and M.E. Southcott

Illustrator:

Reference #: 2270

Status: For Sale

List Price: $125.00

Natural Heritage / Natural History, Toronto, 1992. A Fine quarto volume in like dj; the front boards repeat in purple blind against a grey background the title and facsimile signature of the artist. 174, [2] p.; purple endpapers; references and index. Photographs and 63 plates, all in full colour save for the line drawings.

Odjig (d. 2016 in Kelowna) was elected to the Royal Canadian Academy of Art in 1989 and, amongst other accolades was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002 for her contribution to public life for her paintings and prints. A number of her works are held by the National Gallery of Canada. We can do no better than append their description on the web page devoted to her: “ I see my paintings as a celebration of life. My sub-conscious mind may well dictate some content and I’m content to leave it at that. I am uncomfortable with words - my paintings are perhaps my most honest and legitimate statement.”

Daphne Odjig is one of Canada’s most celebrated Indigenous painters and printmakers. Born on Manitoulin Island’s Wikwemikong reserve of Odawa, Potawatomi and English heritage, she first learned about art-making from her grandfather, Jonas Odjig, a tombstone carver who taught her to draw and paint. She later moved to British Columbia. Odjig’s style, which underwent several developments and adaptations from decade to decade, manages to always remain identifiable. Mixing traditional Indigenous styles and imagery with Cubist and Surrealist influences, Odjig’s work is defined by curving contours, strong outlining, overlapping shapes and an unsurpassed sense of colour.

Her work has addressed issues of colonization, the displacement of Indigenous Peoples, and the status of Indigenous women and children, bringing Indigenous political issues to the forefront of contemporary art practices and theory.

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